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Thứ Sáu, ngày 24 tháng 6 năm 2011

A LETTER FROM PROF. PHAM DUY HIEN TO PRIME MINISTER NAOTO KAN

Giáo sư Phạm Duy Hiển
A letter from Prof. Pham Duy Hien to Prime Minister Naoto Kan

On the occasion of 100 days of Human Fukushima incident and 100 years of nuclear science, Professor Pham Duy Hien, an expert in nuclear science, has a letter to Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan. The following is the full text of the letter:

Your Excellency Prime Minister Naoto Kan,


Round 100 years ago, human beings for the first time did see tiny structure deep inside matter called atomic nuclei. Thirty years later, a nuclear reactor was invented to demonstrate that great energy in these tiny structures can be exploited and conquered. But in less than four years afterwards, the fruits of labor and hard work done by hundreds of scientists involved in the Manhattan Project, which were two atomic bombs, were dropped by the U.S. Army on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in an attempt not to force Japan to surrender, but to show destructive power of their nuclear weapons even after the war. The many talented scientists who conceived the two bombs were too powerless to stop the government from causing disasters to Japan.

Since then, people everywhere in the world have associated atomic energy with the atomic bombs which once caused tragic misfortune to humans, which is unfair!

Nuclear power (NP) appeared in fifty decades after the war well cleared itself of this injustice. A positive atmosphere overwhelmed everyone so that very few scientists at that time (including the writer of this letter) thought that one day nuclear power would again bring misfortunes to humans. But it was our habitual subjectivism overconfidence that led to the accident at the Three Mile Island, and a more serious one in Tchernobyl. Nuclear power has to decline before it reaches its heydays. For more than three decades, the USA did not build a single nuclear power plant.

In this context I am very impressed by the Japanese. Despite your tragic sufferings from the two atomic bombs, and despite the fact that the seismic belt is so close to the east coast, most Japanese people are willing to take risks from nuclear power to ensure energy security for the country’s economic. A greatest and most expensive science and technology program of nuclear power has been deployed for several decades. I think the Japanese people accept nuclear power not because they believe everything is perfectly safe as poers groups often boast about. But above all, they believe in the power of Japan’s advanced technology which can minimize the risk of incidents, and if they do occur, their harmful effects will be minimized.

This is their faith in Japan’s experts in nuclear science, who are successors of Japanese tradition, starting with H. Yukawa and Y. Nishina, two scientists who left their great invention of nuclear physics even before the World War II. The next generations have been successful, too, and Japan now has a powerful nuclear human resource, working in its world-leading research centers, institutes and laboratories.

But - Dear Prime Minister - again a nuclear disaster found its way to the Japanese. One hour after the earthquake and tsunami which devastated the Northeast, when hearing power failure from Fukushima plant, you exclaimed: "Here is the real danger." Early the next day, you flew to the site, entered the bunker with radiation-resistant concrete walls and urged TEPCO to carry out the best measures to cope with the accidents. During the days after that, you always appeared on TV, looking tired by the burdens set on your shoulders. I saw you bow before Japan’s national flag and before the audience to express your sorrows. Somehow, I read a reflection on your face: Where does it all come from?

But the sorrow is not just yours. Now, one hundred days of Fukushima accident, everything are clear enough for us to draw lessons for the next step of nuclear power development, when nuclear science celebrates its centennial birthday. Harnessing nuclear energy will never be an easy thing to do. The situations in Fukushima would not have been so bad if Japan's nuclear power system had not been immersed in the symphony "Everything’s perfect" played continuously by the country’s power groups. The true voices were considered as out of tune. Talented scientists in Japan were not asked for consultancy concerning disaster prevention and situation. Japanese scientist Y. Yamaguchi has his famous comment "The earthquake and tsunami were the trigger only, Japan itself created conditions for such a catastrophic event to happen." The biggest lesson learned from Fukushima is that human beings, rather than modern machinery, are the decisive factor to ensure nuclear safety.


Now, with so much of negative, suspicious manipulation of interest groups cornering state agencies has been uncovered, resulting in despair that millions of Japanese people are experiencing, the majority of Japanese people have to say no with nuclear power. As people have lost their confidence. And so, recently in France, you announced to suspend the program to build dozens of new reactors, instead, renewable energy development has been started. Once Japan is committed to promoting renewable energy, it will be a remarkable milestone for the world. I am waiting to see whether this will be a consistent official energy policy of Japan’s government in the future?

Dear Prime Minister,

Fukushima disaster occurred at a time when Vietnam had just launched nuclear power projects. This projects were already in the agenda when you traveled to Vietnam late last year. This massive project was consulted by the Japanese energy groups and encouraged by them during the past ten years. They have been also very generous in inviting many Vietnamese people to visit nuclear power plants in Japan to import the same symphony “Everything’s perfect” into our country. But our country lacks people who master nuclear power technology to launch such an ambitious program to construct dozens of reactors from 2020 to 2030?

So I think it is better to delay the projects over ten years so that Japan can have time to help Vietnam in training and forming teams of proficient professionals, and promoting projects on renewable energy, soon stopping wasteful and inefficient use of energy as it is now. Vietnam lacks electricity, but the contents of this cooperation will help solve the shortage of electricity more efficiently. It is not necessary to rush to nuclear power which may worry people after all that they saw from Fukushima over the past days.

I look forward to your consideration.
I wish you good health.

Sincerely yours.

Pham Duy Hien, Prof. of Nuclear Science
Người dịch: Hoàng Lan 
___________________________________

*Xin cảm ơn dịch giả Hoàng Lan đã tặng chúng ta bản dịch bức thư quan trọng của Giáo sư Phạm Duy Hiển gửi Thủ tưởng Naoto Kan. 
*Chúng tôi cũng chờ bản hiệu đính của bác Đ.H.L.
*Ảnh chân dung Giáo sư Phạm Duy Hiển là của Báo Tuổi trẻ Online. 


Thư của Giáo sư Phạm Duy Hiển:

Dear Anh Xuân Diện,

Cảm ơn Anh đã post thư ngỏ của tôi để có một lượng độc giả rất cao và nhiều comments thú vị. Cho tôi gửi lời cảm ơn chân thành đến độc giả Ngô Đức Thọ, và một lần nữa xin chia xẻ những gì độc giả này đã viết ra.

Đặc biệt, xin cảm ơn Hoàng Lan đã có một bản dịch tiếng Anh công phu và chính xác. Nếu được, Anh Diện có thể thay mặt tôi và dịch giả HL liên hệ với Vietnam News để đăng toàn văn hay tóm tắt cũng tốt. Hiện nay đã có bản dịch ra tiếng Nhật và được biết bản dịch sẽ (hoặc đã) gửi cho TT Kan.

Một lần nữa xin cảm ơn mọi người.

P D Hiển 

13h, ngày 24.6.2011:
Dưới đây, xin giới thiệu bản hiệu đính của Đ.H.L cho bản dịch của Hoàng Lan

An Open Letter From Frof. Pham Duy Hien to Prime Minister Naoto Kan

Your Excellency Prime Minister Naoto Kan,

One hundred years ago,  mankind for the first time saw tiny structure deep inside matter called atomic nucleus. Thirty years later, a nuclear reactor was invented to demonstrate that immense energy in these tiny structures could be confined and exploited. But in less than four years later, as a result of  hard works done by hundreds of scientists involved in the Manhattan Project, the U.S. military dropped two atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki  not to force Japan’s surrender but to show the post war destructive power of their nuclear weapons. The talented scientists who conceived the two bombs were  powerless to stop the government from causing disasters to Japan.

Since then, people around the world have associated atomic energy with the atomic bombs which once caused tragic and miserable destruction to mankind. How unfortunate!

After the war, Nuclear power (NP) appeared in the 50’s vindicated itself of this misconception. A positive atmosphere overwhelmed scientists at that time (including the writer of this letter), only few thought that one day nuclear power would again bring sufferings to mankind. It was our subjective thinking and  overconfidence that led to the accident at the Three Mile Island, and a more serious one in Tchernobyl. Nuclear power was in  decline before reaching its peak. For more than three decades, the U.S. had not build a single nuclear power plant.

In this context, I am very impressed with the Japanese people. Despite your tragic sufferings from the two atomic bombs and despite the seismic belt close to the east coast, most Japanese people are willing to risk nuclear power in order to secure energy for the country’s economic growth. A comprehensive and  expensive program to develope nuclear power technology has been deployed for several decades. I think the Japanese people accepted nuclear power not because they believed everything is perfectly safe as the power industry groups often boast about. But above all, they believed  Japan’s advanced technology could limit the risk; and if, accidents do occur, their harmful effects will be minimized.

They have faith in Japan’s nuclear technology and experts from great Japanese legacy starting with H. Yukawa and Y. Nishina, who left their great inventions of nuclear physics even before the World War II. The next generations have been successful, too. Japan always  has a great nuclear resources and experts  working in  world-leading research institutes.

But,  Dear Prime Minister, nuclear disaster again found its way to the Japanese. One hour after the earthquake and the tsunami  devastated northeast Japan, when hearing power failure from Fukushima plant, you exclaimed: "Here is the real danger." Early next day, you flew to the site, entering the radiation-proof bunker, to urge TEPCO to carry out the best measures to cope with the accidents. During the following days on TV, you  looked tired by the national burdens set on your shoulders. I saw you bowed before Japan’s national flag and people to express your sorrows. Somehow, I read a reflection on your face: Where does it all come from?

But the sorrow is not just yours. Now, one hundred days of Fukushima accident, things are clear enough for us to draw lessons for the next step of nuclear power development, when nuclear science celebrates its centennial birthday. Harnessing nuclear energy will never be an easy thing to do. The situations in Fukushima would not have been so bad if Japan's nuclear power system had not been immersed in the symphony "Everything’s perfect" orchestrated by the country’s power groups. The true voices were considered as out of tune. Talented scientists in Japan were not consulted in  disaster preventions and solutions. Japanese scientist Y. Yamaguchi has his famous comment: "The earthquake and tsunami were only the triggers, Japan itself created conditions for such a catastrophic event to happen." The biggest lesson learned from Fukushima is that human beings, rather than modern machinery, are the decisive factor to ensure nuclear safety.

Now, with so much of negative, suspicious manipulation of special interest groups cornering state agencies has been uncovered, resulting in despair that millions of Japanese people are experiencing, the majority of Japanese people have to say no with nuclear power. As people have lost their confidence, recently in France, you announced to suspend the program to build dozens of new reactors. Instead, renewable energy development has taken  place. Once Japan is committed to promoting renewable energy, it will be a remarkable milestone for the world. I am waiting to see whether this will be a consistent official energy policy of Japan’s government in the future?

Dear Prime Minister,

Fukushima disaster occurred at a time when Vietnam had just launched nuclear power projects. These projects were already in the agenda when you traveled to Vietnam late last year. These massive projects were consulted and advocated by the Japanese energy groups during the past ten years. They have generously inviting many Vietnamese people to visit nuclear power plants in Japan to import the same symphony “Everything’s perfect” into our country. But our country lacks personnel who master nuclear power technology to launch such an ambitious program of constructing dozens of reactors from 2020 to 2030?

Therefore, I think it is better to delay the projects over ten years so that Japan can have time to help Vietnam in training and forming teams of proficient professionals, who will  promote  renewable energy projects and  eliminate current wasteful and inefficient use of energy. Vietnam needs electricity, these kind of cooperations will help solve the shortage of electricity more efficiently. The public has great concern for what they witnessed from Fukushima in recent days. It is unnecessary to rush to nuclear power.


I look forward to your consideration.

I wish you good health.

Sincerely yours.

Pham Duy Hien, Prof. of Nuclear Science

(translater: hoàng lan)


17 nhận xét:

  1. Cảm ơn dịch giả HL, tôi chưa đọc kỹ, nhưng thấy vài chỗ này:
    "This projects were already in the agenda when you traveled to Vietnam late last year."
    ở dưới lại tiếp:
    "This massive project was ..."
    Vay nen, toi nghi nen sua lai cau tren:"This project was already...

    Trả lờiXóa
  2. Xin sửa lại A LETTER FROM PROF. PHAM DUY HIEN TO PRIME MINIETER NAOTO KAN

    A LETTER FROM PROF. PHAM DUY HIEN TO PRIME MINISTER NAOTO KAN
    This projects thành These projects
    This massive project thành These massive projects
    Lỗi nhỏ thôi nhưng nên sửa ngay
    Cám ơn Bác HL
    zz

    Trả lờiXóa
  3. Vì chúng ta có nhiều dự án DHN nên dùng số nhiều là đúng
    THESE PROJECTS
    MINISTER không phải MINIETER
    lại lỗi cậu dánh máy rồi, Bác Diện ạ.
    Sửa giùm đi thôi.

    Trả lờiXóa
  4. "in fifty decades" de bi hieu la` 50 thap nien lam ba'c Dien oi. (=500 nam)
    Nho ba` con go'p y' cho hoa`n chinh roi goi di cho chac an.
    "Pham Duy Hien, Prof of Nuclear Science" ha`ng cuoi cu`ng na`y thieu dau cham (.) sau chu Prof .

    Trả lờiXóa
  5. Chúng tôi phải cảm ơn Bác Hiển rất nhiều chứ.Sao Bác lại cảm ơn mấy com sĩ chúng tôi làm chúng tôi thấy ngượng.Bác thật là một trí thức chân chính của đất nước. Kính chúc Bác luôn khỏe vui và minh mẫn để giúp đời

    Trả lờiXóa
  6. Có bài điểm trong bài dịch xin trao đổi lại:

    "Nuclear power (NP) appeared in fifty decades after the war well cleared itself of this injustice."

    In the 50s?

    "A greatest and most expensive science and technology program of nuclear power has been deployed for several decades."

    A -> The?

    "Somehow, I read a reflection on your face: Where does it all come from?"

    Where did it all come from?


    "This projects were already in the agenda when you traveled to Vietnam late last year."

    This project was?

    "This massive project was consulted by the Japanese energy groups and encouraged by them during the past ten years."

    the Japanese energy groups?

    This massive project was ... encouraged?

    "the contents of this cooperation"?

    Tôi cho là KHÔNG nên đăng ngay lập tức bài dịch chưa chỉnh.

    Trả lờiXóa
  7. Cảm ơn DHL đã hiệu đính. Một văn bản quan trọng như vậy mà dịch gấp quá nên không thể không thiếu sót. Sau khi tham khảo DHL và chư vị HL xin có bản dịch lại như sau, mong chư vị góp ý

    An Open Letter From Frof. Pham Duy Hien to Prime Minister Naoto Kan

    Your Excellency Prime Minister Naoto Kan,

    One hundred years ago, mankind for the first time saw tiny structures deep inside matter called atomic nuclei. Thirty years later, a nuclear reactor was invented to demonstrate that immense energy in these tiny structures could be conquered and exploited. But in less than four years, as a result of hard work done by hundreds of scientists involved in the Manhattan Project, two atomic bombs were created, which the U.S. military dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki not to force Japan’s surrender but to show the post-war destructive power of their nuclear weapons. The many talented scientists who conceived the two bombs were too powerless to stop the government from causing disasters to Japan.
    Since then, people around the world have associated atomic energy with the atomic bombs, which once caused tragic and miserable destruction to mankind. How unfortunate!

    After the war, Nuclear power (NP) appeared in the 50’s vindicated itself of this misconception. A positive atmosphere overwhelmed scientists at that time (including the writer of this letter), and only few thought that one day nuclear power would again bring sufferings to mankind. It was our subjective thinking and overconfidence that led to the accident at the Three Mile Island, and a more serious one in Tchernobyl. Nuclear power was, therefore, in decline before reaching its peak. For more than three decades, the U.S. had not built a single nuclear power plant.

    In this context, I have been very impressed by the Japanese people. Despite your tragic sufferings from the two atomic bombs and despite the seismic belt close to the east coast, most Japanese people are willing to risk nuclear power in order to secure energy for the country’s economic growth. A comprehensive and expensive program to develop nuclear power technology has been deployed for several decades. I think the Japanese people accepted nuclear power not because they believed everything is perfectly safe as the power industry groups often boast about. But above all, they have always believed that Japan’s advanced technology could limit the risk; and if, accidents do occur, their harmful effects will be minimized.

    They have faith in Japan’s nuclear technology and their experts, who inherit great Japanese legacy starting with H. Yukawa and Y. Nishina, whose great inventions in nuclear physics were made even before the World War II. The next generations have been very successful, too. Japan always has a great nuclear resources and experts working in world-leading research institutes.

    Trả lờiXóa
  8. But, dear Prime Minister, nuclear disaster again found its way to the Japanese. One hour after the earthquake and the tsunami devastated northeast Japan, when hearing power failure from Fukushima plant, you exclaimed: "Here is the real danger." Early the next day, you flew to the site, entering the radiation-proof bunker, to urge TEPCO to carry out the best measures to cope with the accidents. During the following days on TV, you looked tired by the national burdens set on your shoulders. I saw you bowed before Japan’s national flag and people to express your sorrows. Somehow, I read a reflection on your face: Where does it all come from?

    But the sorrow is not just yours. Now, one hundred days of Fukushima accident, things are clear enough for us to draw lessons for the next step of nuclear power development, when nuclear science celebrates its centennial birthday. Harnessing nuclear energy will never be an easy thing to do. The situations in Fukushima would not have been so bad if Japan's nuclear power system had not been immersed in the symphony "Everything’s perfect" orchestrated by the country’s power groups. The true voices were considered as out of tune. Talented scientists in Japan were not consulted in disaster preventions and solutions. Japanese scientist Y. Yamaguchi has his famous comment: "The earthquake and tsunami were only the triggers, Japan itself created conditions for such a catastrophic event to happen." The biggest lesson learned from Fukushima is that human beings, rather than modern machinery, are the decisive factors to ensure nuclear safety.

    Now, with so much of negative, suspicious manipulation of special interest groups cornering state agencies has been uncovered, resulting in despair that millions of Japanese people are experiencing, the majority of Japanese people have to say no to nuclear power. As people have lost their confidence, recently in France, you announced to suspend the program to build dozens of new reactors. Instead, renewable energy development has taken its place. Once Japan is committed to promoting renewable energy, it will be a remarkable milestone for the world. I am waiting to see whether this will be a consistent official energy policy of Japan’s government in the future.

    Dear Prime Minister,

    Fukushima disaster occurred at a time when Vietnam had just launched nuclear power projects. These projects were already in the agenda when you traveled to Vietnam late last year. These massive projects were consulted and advocated by the Japanese energy groups during the past ten years. They have generously invited many Vietnamese people to visit nuclear power plants in Japan to import the same symphony “Everything’s perfect” into our country. But our country lacks personnel who master nuclear power technology to launch such an ambitious program of constructing dozens of reactors from 2020 to 2030?

    Therefore, I think it is better to delay the projects over ten years so that Japan can have time to help Vietnam in training and forming teams of proficient professionals, who will promote renewable energy projects and eliminate current wasteful and inefficient use of energy. Vietnam needs electricity, and these kinds of cooperations will help solve the shortage of electricity more efficiently. The public has great concern for what they have witnessed from Fukushima in recent days. It is unnecessary to rush to nuclear power.

    I look forward to your consideration.

    I wish you good health.

    Sincerely yours.

    Pham Duy Hien, Prof. of Nuclear Science

    (translater: hoàng lan)

    Cám ơn Anh Diện đã kiên nhẫn.

    Trả lờiXóa
  9. HL xin trả lời một số điểm về bài dịch
    HL dùng lại từ conquer thay vì confine của DHL vì nghĩa rộng hơn.
    DHL dùng comprehensive đẻ dịch đồ sộ là rất hay
    fifty decades là bé cái nhầm DHL đã sửa


    Where does it all come from? không dùng thì quá khứ mà dùng hiện tại là cách dùng quá khứ lịch sử, mục đích làm sống động hơn đồng thời hàm ý luôn luôn điều này có thể tái diễn.
    Phần lớn góp ý của DHL thì HL đã tiếp thu cám ơn nhiều.
    Thực ra, HL không có thời giờ rỗi. Nếu Anh Diện để ý thì HL thường pót lúc 2-3 giò sáng. Lúc này thường trí tuệ không minh mãn lắm. Chắc ông Quảng Bạ của TCCS cũng làm việc như HL.
    Cuối cùng xin chư vị thưởng lãm bài dịch đã sửa của HL. Nếu có góp ý nữa, xin tiếp thu. Viết cho TT Nhật đọc chứ chơi à.

    Chúng ta làm việc vô tư, tự nguyện vì sự nghiệp chung của đất nước nên rất mong có nhiều hơn tham gia đóng góp
    Một lần nữa xim cám ơn GS Hiene, GS Diện, DHL và tất cả mọi người.
    HL

    Trả lờiXóa
  10. Translator chứ không phải translater
    xem lại chính tả
    DBND

    Trả lờiXóa
  11. Bác Hoàng Lan ơi,
    Em chưa là Giáo sư bác ơi!

    Trả lờiXóa
  12. Tôi thay mặt ND phong trước cho Bác có sao. Mở cáu Blog như thế này đã là khai sáng biết bao nhân tâm rồi. Nay mai Viết Lịch sử, tôi sẽ so sánh các Bác với thời kỳ Khai Sáng. À, mà quên. Tôi có phải là sử gia đâu.
    Tôi có đề nghị như thế này: Bác Diện tập hợp một số người đẻ từ nay trở đi ta làm các quyển biên niên ghi chép chuyện hằng năm (Almanac). Một nước, một địa phương, một ngành mà có Almanac sẽ rất lợi cho các sử gia sau này viết LS. Bây giờ mới nửa năm còn đủ thời gian để làm ALMANAC VIETNAM 2011 và mời HS Phan Cẩm Thượng vẽ minh họa là hết ý.

    Trả lờiXóa
  13. Tôi hay bị vợ than phiền vị ngội hoại máy tính quên cả V. Anh có bị Trang Phu Nhân than chưa?

    Trả lờiXóa
  14. Bác Diện khiêm tốn thật. Được gọi là GS mà không dám nhận à. Có khối kẻ không ra gì, dốt như bò mà vẫn thích được gọi là GS. Đời hay thật

    Trả lờiXóa
  15. Translater là gì, Có phải là translator không ạ?
    Nói chung dịnh giả Hoàng Lan là một người dũng cảm, dám đưa bản dịch của mình (lại kèm cả bản gốc) ra thanh thiên bạch nhật cho công chúng tha hồ mổ xẻ. Thực sự thì người dịch chỉ có thể dịch tốt từ tiếng nước ngoài sang tiếng mẹ đẻ của mình mà thôi (trừ một số ít trường hợp, thường là người lớn lên trong môi trường sử dụng cả hai ngôn ngữ). Do vậy, nếu có thể thì nên nhờ người nước ngoài viết lại bản dịch (coi như bản nháp) sang tiếng của họ. Bằng không thì nhờ Việt kiều, nhưng phải là người có học hành (và làm việc) ở nước ngoài đã rất nhiều năm, tốt nhất là các GS đại học (như Ngô Bảo Châu chẳng hạn).
    PS. Tiếng Anh oái oăm thế đấy. Người dịch nói (thông ngôn) thì là interpreter mà không là interpretor, nhưng người dịch (viết hay nói) đều có thể gọi là translator.

    Trả lờiXóa
  16. Một cơ hội học ngoại ngữ vô cùng sống động, thực tiễn và đầy động lực. Học ngoại ngữ để cứu Tổ quốc. Xin cảm ơn tất cả các tiền bối.

    Trả lờiXóa
  17. Gởi DLH
    Có bản song ngữ Thư gởi nhà thơ trẻ mà anh đã giới thiệu tại đây nè:
    http://gocsan.blogspot.com/2011/06/letters-to-young-poet-r-m-rilke-1-thu.html

    Trả lờiXóa